Kiran Sethi and DFC, Week 5

 DFC

This week, one of our classes invited the representative of DFC of Taiwan, Kate Hsu to address an inspiring speech. She shared us that the story started occasionally and unexpectedly as she was fascinated by an Indian woman, Kiran Sethi’s short speech on Ted , then she translated English title into Chinese of the video , also sent an email to Lady Kiran about her amazing, impressive speech. Surprisingly, they had common consensus after a while acquaintance. Kate quit her job of English teacher in public school, she also flew to India, England, USA and other cities to experience DFC’s fantastic power among kids worldwide. Now she is the general director of DFC in Taiwan with full supports from Lady Kiran from India. She tries very hard to spread Kiran’s education conviction around Taiwan’s schools.

Link:

http://www.ted.com/talks/kiran_bir_sethi_teaches_kids_to_take_charge.html

Summary

 

“I Can”—-“Aware—-“Enable be changed”——“Empowered”

Contagious is a good word, the faith of “I can” affects the person , the family ,the school ,the community and the whole India .In riverside school, Ahmedabad, Kiran started her idea and encouraged kids to break the boundary between school and life. Kids learn to design solutions for a diverse range of problems. Once they think of the idea “I can”, people around them would be infected the idea as “You can” also their parents believe their kids are capable to change something, finally this idea is as powerful as contagious to change the million lives and the world so as “We can”.

Kiran believes kids are gifted and empowered to change themselves as well as the world. “I can” is not only a slogan of this movement, it helps kid discover their potential power and discover their desires even though in most of India cities they are born from complex family such as poverty, low-educates, alcoholism. It is easy to be in “contagious” via DFC. For example: First, kids are given the chance to experience the laboring hard work and to try to endure those physical discomforts from long-time working after they discover the problem. Second, kids would get awareness of the importance of child labor abolishment issue .Third, try to change the problem with best solutions. They walk to streets out of classroom to tell street vendors stop employing child labors. In another DFC model case, kids teach their parents how to read and write in order to concern about the illiterate problem in India.

Kiran successfully launched this idea of movement throughout the cities all over elementary and high schools in India in 3 years. Moreover she found the “DFC” Design For Change global movement in 2009, which has spread over Asia, Europe, America and UK more than 30 counties since then. In riverside school, India, Kiren, founder of the school also created a series of complete innovated curriculum for kids to challenge to change the life, the world.

DFC 2

About Kiran Sethi

Kiran is a founder of Design For Change (DFC), and founder-director of the Riverside School in Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India, this movement has spread to over 35 countries in three years. Kiran started this global movement with a conviction that if children are empowered and made to feel that they can take matters into their hands, they will change the world for the better.

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DFC Project and Challenge steps

1.   Take one idea 2. Choose one week 3. Change the lives or the world.

(1)  Feel – This step asks students to observe the situations in their community that bother them. After drawing out a list of situations, the students choose one that they would like to change. They explore why this situation bothers them, who are the people affected by this situation and who are the people involved in creating this situation.

(2)  Imagine – This step encourages students to interact with the people of their community to identify points of intervention and possible solutions. The students create their best-case scenario and re-design this situation to make it better.

(3)  Do – The students then develop a plan of action, keeping in mind the resources, budget, time and human resources they have. They then implement this plan.

(4)  Share – The final step is to share the story of change so that other people may be able replicate their solution and also be inspired to new problems. All stories of change are shared on the DFC website. Besides this, schools and organizations host events where the young change-leaders and their stories are celebrated!

Conclusion –the mission of Education

We wonder that “what the mission of education is” after listening the awe-inspiring speech from Kate and Kiran on Ted. Most of children in this generation, they may feel doubtful, fearful or helpless, restricted to their future or now on. They don’t know why to learn and how to learn well, they follow the rules and receive the fixed education which school/government selected, managed. Education is powerful as same as knowledge, we learn, we read and write, we perceive, we appreciate though education and textbook, but we barely experience and achieve it in our school life or in the future.

DFC is the wonderful, amazing concept for children to comprehend the real world, to take challenge for individual even the society, the world. The mission of education is not too ideal to achieve if it is just as government’s policies or the by-product of chaotic, fast-reformulating society. The initial mission of education is simple and easy that helping children find their dreams and create their extraordinary life experiences through challenges and learning. In other words, education serves as the channel of knowledge delivering and the mission to enlighten the students’ potential power internally and externally. By education, what we learn and what we experience not only make us growth completely but also to fit in that uncertain, changeable society/world. (appirio)

DFC official site (Photo credit resource):

http://www.dfcworld.com/default.aspx (Global)

http://dfcworld.com/dfc/TAIWAN/ (TW)

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